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The Best of Laugh-In
Please allow for 6 – 8 weeks for delivery of any thank you gifts 

The Best of Laugh-In

The Best of Laugh-In

The Best of Laugh-In

$175
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COMBO, 3 DVDS

1) DVD, The Best of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In Looks at Holidays
Description: Friends drop in for some holiday cheer as Dan and Dick, Goldie, Lily, JoAnne, Arte, Ruth, Henry and Alan are joined by Kirk Douglas, Jerry Lewis, Jack Lemmon, Bob Hope, Rock Hudson, Sammy Davis, Jr., Tom and Dick Smothers, Jack Benny, Phil Silvers, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Flip Wilson and Kate Smith.

Judy Carne and Gladys both tell Santa what they want for Christmas. Tyrone F. Horneigh reminisces about trying to get a pin-up picture of Gladys Ormfby. Meanwhile, Gladys gives three holiday “gotchas” to Rock Hudson. Ernestine chats with Aristotle Onassis and Flip Wilson delivers a psychedelic weather report for the holidays.

Then Dan and Dick give a holiday “Fickle Finger of Fate” to the over-price3d toy manufacturers, while Jack Benny drops by for a 25-cent “Sock it to me.” Bob Hope is joined by Arte’s German character who is still upset that Bob Hope’s Christmas trips to entertain the troops never included a stop-off at his bunker. Rounding out the non-stop laughs are some of the funniest outtakes from the series. This memorable show includes all the cast, many of their cameo friends, some great mistakes and wonderful memories of holidays past. Running Time: 49:03 minutes

2) DVD, The Best of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In Looks at Love & Romance
Dan and Dick are joined by all of the regular cast members as they reminisce through six years of hugging, kissing, love-ins and “gotchas” as they pay homage to that sacred day honoring St. Valentine. A lot of valentines, but very few saints, appear as Laugh-In looks at love, sex, marriage and romance, but not all at the same time. The spark of romance between Tyrone Horneigh and Gladys Ormfby becomes a raging fire when Gladys asks Edward G. Robinson to be her Valentine, and then gives a passionate kiss to Johnny Carson at the kissing booth.

Sid Caesar joins the Laugh-In girls at a wife-swapping swap meeting after which they present “Tiny Tim Returns” to sing The News Song, with the news of the past, present and future, featuring the girls as a Valentine’s greeting, each wearing a heart on their gowns. Peter Sellers tries to smoke tea, but can’t keep the tea bag lit. Sammy Davis gives a report explaining the violence in Southeast Asia. Ernestine calls Mae West about misusing her instrument. Dick Martin appears as the famous stripper, Boom Boom La Tush. Liza Minnelli sends a valentine to Joe Nameth, and Marcello Mastroianni explains to Lily’s “tasteful lady” why Italian men are such good lovers – and then proves it.

This reunion special was a real favorite, made even more special with visits from Raquel Welch, John Wayne, Peter Sellers, Jack Benny, Gene Hackman, Peter Lawford, Don Adams, Liza Minnelli and Sid Caesar, who appear in some classic bits from the cutting room floor. Running Time: 49:02 minutes

3) DVD, The Best of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In – Anniversary Special
Rowan And Martin's Laugh-In was the NBC comedy-variety program which became an important training ground for a generation of comic talent. If The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour captured the political earnestness and moral conscience of the 1960s counterculture, Laugh-In snared its flamboyance, its anarchic energy, and its pop aesthetic, combining the black-out comedy of the vaudeville tradition with a 1960s-style "happening."

Everyone seemed to want to appear on Laugh-In, with guests on one memorable episode including Jack Lemmon, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hugh Hefner, and presidential candidate Richard Nixon. But no guest appeared for more than a few seconds at a time, and none received the kind of screen time grabbed by the program's ensemble of talented young clowns.

The comic regulars -- Goldie Hawn's dizzy blonde, Lily Tomlin's snorting telephone operator, Ruth Buzzi's perpetually-frustrated spinster, Arte Johnson's lecherous old man, Jo Anne Worley's anti-Chicken-Joke militant, Henry Gibson's soft-spoken banal poet, Pigmeat Markham's all-powerful Judge and countless others dominated the program – along with Gary Owens’ over-modulated announcer. Many of these comics moved almost overnight from total unknowns to household names and many became important stars for the subsequent decades. Running Time: 98:31 minutes program (includes additional skits beyond broadcast program) + 47:10 minutes of bonus feature

Please allow for 6 – 8 weeks for delivery of any thank you gifts 

The Best of Laugh-In

$85
Pledge Now!

DVD, THE BEST OF ROWAN & MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN - ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

Rowan And Martin's Laugh-In was the NBC comedy-variety program which became an important training ground for a generation of comic talent. If The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour captured the political earnestness and moral conscience of the 1960s counterculture, Laugh-In snared its flamboyance, its anarchic energy, and its pop aesthetic, combining the black-out comedy of the vaudeville tradition with a 1960s-style "happening."

In an age of "sit-ins," "love-ins" and "teach-ins," NBC was proposing a "laugh-in" which somehow bridged generational gaps. Originally a one-shot special, Laugh-in was an immediate hit and quickly became the highest-rated series of the late 1960s. In a decade of shouted slogans, bumper stickers, and protest signs, Laugh-In translated its comedy into discrete one-liners hurled helter-skelter at the audience in hopes that some of them would prove funny. Many of them became catch-phrases: "Sock it to me," "Here come de judge," "You bet your sweet bippy," and "Look that up in your Funk and Wagnalls."

In this frenetic and fragmented series, comic lines were run as announcements along the bottom of the screen, printed in vivid colors on the bodies of bikini-clad go-go girls, and shouted over the closing credits. The humor was sometimes topical, sometimes nonsensical, sometimes "right on" and sometimes left of center, but it largely escaped the censorship problems which besieged the Smothers Brothers. Its helter-skelter visual style stretched the capabilities of television and video-tape production, striving for the equivalent of the cutting and optical effects Richard Lester brought to the Beatles movies.

Laugh-In broke down the traditional separation of comedy, musical performance, and dramatic interludes which had marked most of the earlier variety shows and changed the celebrity host’s conventional position as mediator of the flow of entertainment. Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, successful Las Vegas entertainers, sought to orchestrate the proceedings but were constantly swamped by the flow of sight-gags and eccentric performances which surrounded them. Similarly, guest stars played no privileged role here.

Everyone seemed to want to appear on Laugh-In, with guests on one memorable episode including Jack Lemmon, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hugh Hefner, and presidential candidate Richard Nixon. But no guest appeared for more than a few seconds at a time, and none received the kind of screen time grabbed by the program's ensemble of talented young clowns.

The comic regulars -- Goldie Hawn's dizzy blonde, Lily Tomlin's snorting telephone operator, Ruth Buzzi's perpetually-frustrated spinster, Arte Johnson's lecherous old man, Jo Anne Worley's anti-Chicken-Joke militant, Henry Gibson's soft-spoken banal poet, Pigmeat Markham's all-powerful Judge and countless others dominated the program – along with Gary Owens’ over-modulated announcer. Many of these comics moved almost overnight from total unknowns to household names and many became important stars for the subsequent decades.

This DVD is a great compilation of some of the highlights of the series. Also included the following extra feature.

Bonus Feature: Not too long ago, the entire cast of Laugh-In, along with guest stars and cameo stars, attended a large press conference. It got pretty lively with never-before-told behind-the-scenes stories. Some of the recollections involved endless battles with censors and hoisy negotiations trying to make the network understand, appreciate and accept some of the outrageous things that the cast loved to do.

Alan Sues discussed what went on behind the Joke Wall. JoAnne Worley sang her parodies. Ruth Buzzi sang her operatic composition “Don’t Futz Around. Arte Johnson did his famous Russian folk singer, Rosemenko. Henry Gibson did a couple of poems. Goldie Hawn recalled some of the ways that the cast and crew devoted time to make her break up and giggle.

The event was filled with warm and wonderful recollections of a group of people who banded together to help each other, changed the face of television and achieved some of the most spectacular ratings in the history of television, while inventing characters, creating slogans and having a real good time.

Running Time: 98:31 minutes program (includes additional skits beyond broadcast program) + 47:10 minutes of bonus feature